FAQs

What is the warranty on your anchors?

We provide a lifetime warranty against manufacturing defects, and even against bending or deformation. Refer to the Warranty Page for more information.

Where can I buy one of your anchors?

We have a worldwide network of distributors and dealers who can provide you with a Rocna or Vulcan. Refer to our Where to Buy Page for a dealer near you. If you can’t find a local source, contact us and we will match you up with a dealer.

What is the best way to set a Rocna or Vulcan anchor?

While both the Rocna and Vulcan anchors offer extremely quick sets across a range of bottom types, they may require some modification to anchoring technique. Peter Smith, designer of Rocna and Vulcan, offers the following tips to optimize setting performance:

  1. Shackle the anchor directly to the chain using a good quality load rated shackle. The shackle body passes through the shank, and the pin through the chain. Use the largest size shackle that the pin will fit through the chain. Rocna does not recommend swivels, as they can be a weak point, are generally not necessary, and for the Vulcan in particular can add too much weight to the end of the shank, impacting setting performance.
  2. Don’t drag the anchor while trying to set it. With the old generation Plough type anchors it was traditional to use lots of chain and drag them, usually some distance to get them to set, often on the second or third try. With Rocna and Vulcan, you want to avoid any pull before sufficient scope is paid out.
  3. When deploying the anchor drop out your scope at 5:1 (water depth + anchor roller above water X 5 ). Try not to drag the anchor before at least 3:1 is deployed.
  4. When deployed let the boats backward momentum and or wind set the anchor rather than engine power initially. Other than low rev’s to get the boat moving in the right direction don’t back down on the unset anchor with any power.
  5. You should feel the anchor start to set as the rode takes up. Only then by all means use some engine power to complete the set and reassure yourself it is in. However, I don’t recommend any more than 25% revs until the anchor has had a few hours to work itself in.
  6. If you do ever have to re-set the anchor always clean the old mud off first before redeploying – otherwise caked mud can interfere with subsequent sets.

The point of the above is to reduce build-up of substrate on the top edge of the shank in a soft bottom by dragging it before enough rode is deployed. The initial setting position of most modern anchors is on their sides and they don’t like being dragged any distance before this is attained.

If you are short on swinging room you can shorten scope to 3:1 after the anchor is set, and still have around 90% holding power. Let out more scope up to 7:1 if it starts blowing hard.

Use this technique, and you should get an instant set every time.

Any questions? Contact us at enquiries@rocna.com.

If your anchor sets so well, how do I retrieve it?

Motor forward retrieving rode until your bow is above the anchor. Typically a straight vertical pull will break the anchor loose. In the event that the anchor is difficult to break loose, either due to severe weather or a hard clay bottom, don’t bog down the windlass (or strain your back). Typically there will be some swell in the anchorage – every time the bow dips with the swell, take in a few inches of rode. After several cycles, the buoyancy of the boat will have worked the anchor loose and you can easily retrieve. In the event there is no swell, you can cleat off the rode and drive over the anchor with your motor to break it loose. This will be the exception, however – most of the time a straight vertical pull will do the trick.

What if the anchor gets stuck under a rock?

Motor forward retrieving rode until your bow is above the anchor. Typically a straight vertical pull will break the anchor loose. In the event that the anchor is difficult to break loose, either due to severe weather or a hard clay bottom, don’t bog down the windlass (or strain your back). Typically there will be some swell in the anchorage – every time the bow dips with the swell, take in a few inches of rode. After several cycles, the buoyancy of the boat will have worked the anchor loose and you can easily retrieve. In the event there is no swell, you can cleat off the rode and drive over the anchor with your motor to break it loose. This will be the exception, however – most of the time a straight vertical pull will do the trick.

Should I choose a Rocna or a Vulcan?

The Vulcan was developed for boaters who wanted to enjoy the security and performance of a Rocna, but had difficulty fitting it on their bow due to interference with the roll bar. When designing the Vulcan, the design intent was to match the performance of the Rocna, and in our internal testing and feedback from customers, we believe we have achieved our goal. Therefore the question of Rocna or Vulcan is determined by which anchor fits better on your bow – in either case, you will enjoy the same quick sets, massive holding power, and reliable performance across the full range of bottom types.

Will Rocna or Vulcan fit my boat?

We have several resources which can assist you in evaluating the fit on your boat.  Refer to the Anchor Fitment Guide, and if you have any questions please contact us.

What size Rocna or Vulcan is suitable for my boat?

Rocna is conservative in their ratings, basing them on 50 knots of wind and associated wave conditions. On this basis, you can refer to the sizing chart on our Fitment Guide, which recommends an appropriate size based on the length and displacement of your boat. If you have a multi-hull, we recommend going up one size from the sizing chart recommendation. If you have questions, please contact us.